editorial
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A Note From the Newsroom on World Press Freedom Day On World Press Freedom Day, we laud great progress but note that true freedom of the press has yet to be achieved in Burma.

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March 30 was the day that Burma, formerly beleaguered by military rule, saw its first democratically elected government since 1962 sworn into office.

Commentary
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Disunity among ethnic armed groups may result in irreconcilable demands, frustrating Suu Kyi’s plans for a ‘21st Century Panglong Conference.’

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Burma’s Right to Information Movement Can Learn From India A grassroots movement started in rural India in the 1980s overturned a decades-old policy of government secrecy. Burma could learn a lot from this process.

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Why is Min Aung Hlaing, the Burma Army’s Commander-in-Chief, cozying up to Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy? And will it work?

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The National League for Democracy risks losing the support of ethnic groups if it continues to ignore their demands and engaging in petty party politics.

contributor
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Burma’s Right to Information Movement Can Learn From India A grassroots movement started in rural India in the 1980s overturned a decades-old policy of government secrecy. Burma could learn a lot from this process.

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A Tale of Two Mega-Dams: Burma and Borneo A nixed dam in Malaysian Borneo could provide useful parallels for opponents of the controversial Myitsone dam in Burma’s Kachin State.

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Burma’s new government has a chance to end decades of ethnic conflict, but a new approach to the peace process may be in order.

Cartoon
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President Htin Kyaw Opts for the Bear Hug