Can Suu Kyi Lead?

Sixteen years ago, in a commentary I wrote for the Bangkokbased newspaper The Nation titled “The Trouble with Suu Kyi,” I committed a small act of heresy by suggesting that the revered leader of Burma’s pro-democracy movement was not above criticism.

At the time, my opinions were seen by some as a betrayal of the cause that so many Burmese had embraced and dedicated their lives to. It wasn’t really that anybody thought Suu Kyi was perfect; but to point out her flaws was to give comfort to the hated regime that then ruled Burma with an iron fist.

Those days are over, and now it sometimes seems like it’s open season on Suu Kyi, even as she continues to be an object of adulation among ordinary Burmese and world leaders alike.

During her recent tour of the United States, Suu Kyi showed that she can still attract adoring crowds wherever she goes. But at the same time, she was also trailed by critics who noted that her stance on the burning ethnic issues of the day left a great deal to be desired.

As a Nobel Peace Prize winner and an international icon for democracy and human rights, many expected Suu Kyi to be more outspoken about the ongoing war in Kachin State and recent communal violence in Arakan State. In both places, lives have been lost, tens of thousands of people have been uprooted, basic rights have been brutally abused, and no workable solutions have been put forth.

Aung Zaw is founder and editor of the Irrawaddy magazine. He can be reached at [email protected]

Confronted with all of this, Suu Kyi merely said that she did not wish to complicate the government’s efforts to address these issues. On the Rohingya, a population of Muslims living in northern Arakan State, she wouldn’t even say if they should be considered citizens of Burma. Instead, she offered her by now standard response that only restoring the rule of law would bring any lasting answers to Burma’s problems.

People I met in Burma during my latest visit were also keenly aware of Suu Kyi’s efforts to avoid speaking out on the ethnic problems facing Burma. Many were disappointed that she did not clearly come out on the side of the Kachin, who have long supported her. But on the even more contentious issue of the status of Rohingya, most seemed to think she was wise not to say too much.

Ironically, Suu Kyi’s newfound reticence could be seen as a good thing. For decades, she was often faulted for putting principles before pragmatism. In 2010, for instance, she refused to take part in a junta-sponsored election because she knew it would be a sham.

But it isn’t just her sudden conversion to realpolitik that has surprised some observers. Many have noted that during her trip to the US, which coincided with a separate visit by President Thein Sein, Suu Kyi was careful to avoid sending any messages that would conflict with his. Once the perennial dissident, Suu Kyi is now not just playing ball with the government—she’s on the same team.

This is not to say, however, that Suu Kyi has suddenly abandoned all hope of leading the country herself. On the contrary, soon after her return, she said at a press conference: “As the leader of a political party, I have the courage to be president, if the people so wish.”

The trouble with this, of course, is that not withstanding Thein Sein’s endorsement of her eligibility for the presidency in an interview with the BBC, Suu Kyi is constitutionally barred from being president because of her family ties to a foreign country. Her late husband, Michael Aris, was a British academic, and her two sons were both born in the UK.

But Suu Kyi is not one to be so easily deterred.

“It means we need to amend the Constitution,” she said. “It’s part of the parliamentary process. We will keep pushing for it. Not just for me, but for the country.”

But the Constitution is not the only obstacle to Suu Kyi becoming the leader of the nation. Another, more daunting, hurdle must also be cleared: her apparent inability to set her own house in order and provide genuine leadership within her own party.

The National League for Democracy (NLD), the party Suu Kyi helped found in 1988, has justifiably come under fire for its reputation for being little more than a club of Suu Kyi loyalists and its failure to reach out to other influential groups in Burmese society.

Despite its resounding victory in recent by-elections, winning 43 of 44 seats it contested, the NLD has so far failed to rise above the level of amateurish management, with poor public relations and even worse mechanisms for attracting and cultivating real political talent.

Many returning exiles and intellectuals complain that they have been kept at arms length from Suu Kyi, who is jealously guarded by those closest to her. Even members of the 88 Generation Students group who I spoke to showed some disappointment in this situation, although they all professed their respect and admiration for the Lady herself.

Some observers have ruefully remarked that even Than Shwe, the despised dictator who handed power over to Thein Sein last year, did a better job of choosing suitable subordinates to support his long-term goals. Suu Kyi, who will be 70 years old by the time Burma is ready to go to the polls again in 2015, has given no hint of who her political successor will be, and no one in her party stands out as a likely candidate.

There is little doubt that Suu Kyi still enjoys enormous support among Burma’s people, despite questions among some about her commitment to the country’s minorities. However, looking beyond the next few years, she needs to think not just about her own role in Burma’s future politics, but also that of a younger generation of would-be leaders.

One way or the other, Suu Kyi’s place in Burmese history is assured. But if she wants to leave a legacy of lasting stability, and not just an image of heroic self-sacrifice as a guide to future generations, she’s going to have to have to start tackling the problems of her country—and her party—head on.


29 Responses to Can Suu Kyi Lead?

  1. Right on the money, as far as the need to begin to nurture future leaders of her party. But, then, we must not forget that she has been under house arrest for so many years and out and about for only less than two years moving from the world of hope and admiration as a democracy icon to the world of realpolitik, learning the ropes along the way the art of diplomacy and how to be a good politician in trying to lead the country and the people towards a democratic goal. It’s a tall order for her or for anyone, in making it work.

    I would think that discretion is the better part of valor, in her case, at least at this juncture when she has to build a strong political base and, at the same time, to cast a realistic eye on the 2015 election with all that that needs to be done in the process.

    Looking in the light of all the points I cited above, I hope, one would be able to appreciate her position and the way she is weaving her way through in a maze of troubles and problems Burma has accumulated, over the years, since independence. Let us give her due support and some time and a good dose of patience in her endeavor to make Burma a peaceful and prosperous nation it deserves to be.

    Khin Maung Htay
    Silver Spring, USA

  2. Right on the money, as fas as the need to begi

  3. Right on the money, as far as the need to begin to nurture future leaders of her party. But, then, we must not forget that she has been under house arrest for so many years and out and about for less than two years moving from the world of hope and admiration as a democracy icon to the world of realpolitik, learning the ropes along the way the art of diplomacy and how to be a good poltician in trying to lead the country and the people towards a democratic goal. It’s a tall order for her or anyone, in making it work.

    I would think that discretion is the better part of valor, in her case, at least at this juncture, when she has to build a strong political base and, at the same time, to cast a realistic eye on the 2015 election with all that that needs to be done in the process.

    Looking in the light of all the points I cited above, I hope, one would be able to appreciate her position and the way she is weaving her way through in a maze of troubles and problems Burma has accumulated, over the years, since Independence.

    Let us give her due support and some time and a good dose of patience in her endeavor to make Burma a peaceful and prosperous nation it deserves to be.

    Khin Maung Htay
    Silver Spring, USA

  4. Absolutely spot on.  The opposition is plagued by a personality cult, and needs to come to grips with the timeless  Buddhist law of impermanence. 

    Their counterparts in govt are far from amateurs. They have ruled Burma for a half century, seen off all challenges, domestic and foreign, and now they have already successfully 
    co-opted ASSK/NLD and expat dissidents, some of whose organisations have collapsed since her change of stance to become a parliamentarian.  The KIA and KNU next, and it’ll be a hat trick.  Happy families that the West can do business with, mission beautifully accomplished….kerrching!

    Makes you wonder if she might be her own worst enemy notwithstanding her rebuttal of hubris regarding her iconic status at Harvard. Certainly no chance of a dynastic rule, never mind Aung San Oo.

  5. I’m sure she never wanted to be a leader of
    any ethnic groups, i.e., either minority or majority groups. She is just a
    person who loves the country where she belongs to and wanted to see it growing
    like any other developed country, which is the only reason she is still staying
    strong. Some people claimed recently that she was their national leader because
    it suited them.

    Kachin leaders should take their own responsibilities. They used
    to be cronies of military junta for 17 years and made a lot of monies out from
    selling the resources belong to Kachin people.

    Karen leaders themselves are in power struggling as usual
    and neglecting what Karen IDPs needed.

    Rohingyas went OTT (Over-the-top) by claiming citizenships
    for ALL regardless of living in Burma for decades or for a few years.

    Burmans are still need to learn how to be tolerant.  Whether they like the immigrants or not; they
    have to accept that if there is a border, there will be immigration problems.

    Burmese military junta and their cronies are still holding
    full power and businesses in Burma and it is still a long way for them to come
    clean.

    It’s human nature to sought for their own agendas. But why some groups
    have suddendly got the rights to blame on ASSK’s silence? What have they achieved in the last 60 years on their
    own? What benefit do they think she will get if she ever wins the presidency in
    2015?

    ASSK is now getting older and she needs to think of how long
    she can serve for the country.  The only sensible
    choice she has at the moment is to swallow her pride for the sake of the under-privileged
    people living in the country and see whether all the arrangements are going as
    planned.

    Instead of blaming of ASSK, people just have to work out for their own ways
    to sort things out.  If they want to rely
    on her, trust in her judgements, give her way and support her course. 

    There is no two ways about it. You can either be a
    good leader or a good follower.  If you
    have the abilities to lead, please do so. If not, R.E.S.P.C.T the leader that
    you are relying on.

    • Well! She used to be for the oppressed. Now, she is with the oppressors. We are not talking about the ethnics or the Myanmars. The Myanmars are the oppressed too. Thein Sein is one of the oppressors who stands firm for nothing. He just serves as a president with motivation. He is not a reformer but he is just working like hourly-paid employee. And Suu Kyi is becoming like mercenary. She grabbed a bunch of awards and she can go back to England and take some nap. It is Okay. We were like this. And we are like this. Ans we will be the same like this in 2050.

      • You sounded like a jealous grumpy old person. If you think awards are free for everyone, why don’t you earn one for yourself first.
        Is that your idea of teaching our future generations by saying awards mean
        nothing? I am sure Burma will be the same like this in 2050 if  younger
        generations are inspired by people like you.

        •  The Bamas don’t want to accept other races but want other races to treat them fairly and sympathize them. It makes me wonder why they still come to the US, the West and die to claim their share of minority favor (like some of my classmates at Berkeley or Stanford, not for the purpose of tooting my own horn here, but being surprised by the “you owe me attitude.”

           So, Le Doug Tho of North Vietnam,  Arafat of Palestine and even Obama who have not done or contributed to  any peace work and won the Nobel Peace prize just makes me wonder is that prize slated for those who go to jail long enough or who know how to play politics well enough while all other Nobel prizes are earned by those who have contributed and done long lasting work in their respective fields for decades before they are being selected or considered.  Let me apply to go to jail tomorrow to start the
          process of being selected. It is better than being told “you are not a citizen
          of Myanmar  because of bla, bla, bla……..” 
          All I will say is those who live in glass houses should not forget not to throw stones.   

    • As a rakhine, I would like to say “There is no rohigya”. We(I) respect human right, we need security and identity as our priority. This is our own land for more than 1000 years civilization even longer than europe. We have right to rule…We care about other sub ethnics such as (maramar gri, kami, mro, other hill tribes, kaman muslim and  chin) but we will prevent bengalis invasion with islamic agenda. If bengalis want to stay in rakhine, they have to learn our culuture, people and respect others Those benglis migrants are the aggressor and getting support from all islamist states(OIC) and would like swallow everythings…

    • What kind of inspiration you are handing over to the next generation? Superior-minded mentality? Bossy? Bullying? We do not need Suu Kyi nor your stepfather Thein Sein. Just leave us alone. We do not need you to leave a legacy to our children. What we need from the Myanmars is “Get out from the lands of the ethnics”. I have never been relying on Suu Kyi nor Thein Sein your stepfather. I have been my own man throughout my whole life. I never ate a spoonful of rice from your family. Therefore, just leave us alone. Get out of Kachinland. Get out of Shanland. Get out of Karenniland. Get the Hell out of Karenland. Get the Hell out of Mon, Chin and Rakhineland.

      • Don’t lose it kid! Surely, you can’t be a representative for
        all the ethnics that you are talking about. I’m also one of the minority
        ethnics and I can’t be shouting out loud for all of them.

        To response your question, “What kind of inspiration you are
        handing over to the next generation?”,

        I simply have to say “make friends with your neighbours and
        improve your social skills”.

        No man can live on an island. Especially if you are living
        at the moment aboard or another other ethnic land that you don’t belong to, you
        don’t want to make enemies within the community.

        Have you ever heard of saying “When in Rome, do as the
        Romans do”? We are now living in the era of globalization. By appreciating the
        cultures of the locals (you don’t need to change your culture or identity),
        others will appreciate your cultures too.

      • You are nothing but an emotional moron who doesn’t know what he or she is talking about. If you have that attitude, you’d better get out of Burma as well and I’m sure you are out of Burma.

    • You should be working with Daw Suu or at least for Burma. Not a lot of Burmese people have a clear idea of Daw Suu and what is happening in Burma. Burmese people blame this Lady who has shown a lot of courage and who still doesn’t have the power to do things. I wish Burmese people were more intelligent. I’m also Burmese. No offence, eh!

  6. Let see whether she can lead “Rule of law committee”. She seems so smart. It does not guarantee that she can lead. The worst part is, Suu Kyi is no longer working with us but she is part of the Junta now.

  7. As the Buddhist Teaching explains everything is multiple caused. So are the problems in Burma.
    One cannot expect Aung San Suu Kyi to solve the problems on her own. Everybody has to look at ones own responsibility into causing, creating, maintaining AND solving the problem. It is time that the peoples of Burma unite and make it known. Not to emphasize on ethnic differences, but on unity. The political landscape is changing and in order to maintain that cause we should focus on the right things. Aung San Suu Kyi cannot do it on her own. We should also not hold her responsible for the ultimate solution of it. Cooperation and mutual respect is essential in this.
    Every country in this world that had to overcome this kind of disturbances needed time to develop. Don’t blame anyone for not succeeding, praise the for trying! It will need a generation or two to overcome it all.
    We have to focus on doing the wholesome things ourselves and when we do that there will be an uplifting force. Being negative and indulging in unwholesome useless comments is no contribution at all.

  8. I would like to suggest Daw Aung San Suu Kyi to ACTIVELY recruit talents in its ranks to strengthen the party. It would be best if 88 Generations Students (led by Ko Min Ko Naing and Ko Ko Ko Gyi) can be co opted to the leadership of NLD. What I mean by actively recruiting is that instead of just saying that NLD is open to all talents , it should actively seek out talents and invite them to join the party. First NLD should define quality criteria of people it wants to recruit and talk to those people if they want to join the party. I am making this suggestion because I want to see NLD as a stronger and more viable democratic party that can transform Myanmar for all of us.

    • This is an outrageous suggestion Naing Moe Aung.

      Why DASSK has to actively recruit talents for her party?
      This is not some sort of job vacancies. If a person shares the same political
      values with ASSK and NLD party, he/she should be able to join the party voluntarily
      including 88 generation students or yourself.

      I am sure NLD is open to all regardless of any qualities. But to become the elected leader(s) is totally different scenarios
      which often involves elections of the party membership. The first and foremost
      quality you need to become a party leader is that you have to convince the
      majority of party members that you are a worthy leader to represent them. Not
      an easy job, is it?

      If you don’t have any qualities of yourself to do this hard
      work, you better keep all your suggestions to yourself.

      • First, I am making this suggestion because I want to see NLD stronger, I want to see it better – I have no other motives. Allow me to explain more, I think DAASK has to actively recruit talents for her party because people are the most important asset of any organizations. Nurturing future leaders and surrounding oneself with the best possible talents is the first priority for any leaders. For example, Singapore Government proactively recruits talents from all sectors (private, non-profit, government) with rigorous evaluation process, borrowing from the best practices of Shell Corporation, a very successful multinational oil & gas giant. I am not saying that Singapore’s practice is the best because they have their own weaknesses. In our own history, our beloved Bogyoke Aung San also did proactive recruitment of talents – for example Bogyoke personally wrote a letter to Sama Duwa Sinwa Nawng to join him. Bogyoke also co opted people like ICS U Tin Htut who was not a political activist but highly competent British trained civil servant. For those reasons, I feel that NLD should start talent recruitment as a key initiative to co opt people it wants as its next generation of leaders. You may have different view Ma Thandar Myint because it is your democratic right and I respect that.

  9. The Burmese Freedom Fighter

    Ko Aung Zaw, your article is quite sensible and constructive rather than heresy to the ideas of Suu Kyi is still the best leader that Burma can offer right now to lead Burma to success its democratic society. It is all of us job to keep finding the best leader and actively contribute in her or his leadership skills by democratic principle, an effective contribution that you have been doing since day one of your departure from Burma, which what you humbly called in this article was a small act of heresy to Burma democratic movement that you had committed 16 years ago in the nation newspaper of Thailand. 

    Given the situation of only a year of free movement after almost 2 decades of being under house arrest, Daw Suu has been doing remarkably great in bouncing back into Burma politic as a major player through her resilient attitude, laying out the pragmatic ways of changing Burma without fear of losing her own reputation. 

    She is in a position of being a captain of wrecked ship which just survived in the perfect storm of tyranny, a ship that need to be rebuilt before heading back to its journey of democracy when the weather is in favor, securing its safety, and grantee of arrival time to its destination. Your article actually gives a free consultation of requirement for the type of the ship she has been trying to rebuild.

    Since her achievement within a year is where her party and Burma is today, I could imagine the potential of Burma under her leadership as a president of Burma for a long term security, stability, and prosperity.  Her actions inspire all of us to dream more, to learn more, to do more and become more. She is a true leader of Burma, not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus that will shape the future Burma in the history of at all time.
    The Burmese Freedom Fighter

  10. Don’t foerget that  the Monster UTS is still shadowing  to protect his crony business men, that is why U Thein Seing is still reluctant to approve Foreign Direct Invest Law when red light shown from foreign influential institutions.  At the same time what   he orders,  even Min Aung Hlaing does not even listen to the President.  On the other hand, Daw Su as an Angel of  Honourable  Awards  even put her signature to demolish  Constitutional Court,  when  Shwe Man said no one is above parliament, it implies that  no one is above him including the President. So where is her principle of no one is above the law? Now Hluttaw as the highest institution can do whatever they want to do since there is no constitutional court to oversees senators’ crimes.  Where is Second Panlong as she promised  during political campaign?  I still respect her as Bogyoke Aung San’s deaughter, the only person for future of  Myanmar we can hope for.

  11. The Burmese Freedom Fighter

    I can feel your passion and positive energy for a change in Burma. I believe that all social change comes from the passion of individuals like yourself. One person with passion is better than thousands of people merely interested. We have to find more people whose heart are on fire when it comes to Burma issues.  I am convinced that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is absolutely the best and the most capable leader whom Burma can offer for the time being for its path to democratization through practical lessons of how to think, not what to think in accepting her leadership. 

    The Burmese Freedom Fighter

  12. I don’t understand what the commentator is talking about?  Is he trying to stimulate the readers mind?   Is he for or against Suu Kyi’s handling of the events that were mentioned? I think Suu Kyi is doing exactly what she is supposed to.   If  you are a reasonable man then you should let the lead man go through the process before jumping in to criticize the process.  I think she is doing exactly what the seasoned politician would do.  What I don’t stand is that everybody wants her to act like the president of the country.  Remember she is just another member of the governing body.  As a member of parliment she is to make laws and assist the president.  Remember she is in Naypyidaw now not in Rangoon anymore.  I don’t know if she is or will be the best to lead Burma.  Just take a look at other such as the wife of Aquino, the relatives of Ghandi and the jury is still out for Thailand prime minister.  They were not all that great in leading their countries to the promised land.  US presidents have 4 years to accomplish what they set out to do  Suu Kyin has so far less than 2 years and she is not the president of Burma.  She doesn’t have to lead.  Maybe she can be the leader of the parliment.

  13. I think it is still premature to judge Daw Suu as she hasn’t played all  of the cards yet. If Daw Suu speaks openly about the Rohingyas  based on human rights, then she will be going against the will of the Burmese people, as majority of the Burmese still see Rohingyas  illegal immigrants. Why do you think she should commit political suicide? Regarding the kachins , the Kachin leadership was with the generals for 17 years doing business and sharing the profits happily. KIO is still fighting with the generals because they want the fair share of the new found wealth. KIO is no different from the generals. They are all about money and power. They have never showed their desire of working with the Opposition parties to bring peace and democracy to Burma. What do you say now? Burma’s problems must be resolved by every single Burmese but not Daw Suu alone. Are we Burmese that retarded to rely on one dainty Lady? Come on! Wake up and work for the country and the people instead of blaming Daw Suu and praising the idiotic generals.

  14.  I don’t understand you for not accepting the fact that a party should recruit talented members. Do you believe NLD is so great and so  perfect that it doesn’t  need anyone? Do you think seeking new talented members will cause damage than benefit?Do you think a party should only announce ” our party is open to all and passively wait for applications.?

    You seem very smart and eloquent and a strong supporter of NLD.  But I don’t understand you take “recruitment” as an offend to NLD.I read all your comments.You make many good points. many of your comments are reasonable but I dont not agree with  you  on  Recruitment.

    One more, I can’t accept your  attacks on those having different views and suggestion. I mean Naing Moe Aung. you can defend your view but I dont think your reply ” This is an outrageous suggestion Naing Moe Aung ” is not polite as an academic.

    • Do you believe NLD is so great and so perfect that it doesn’t need anyone? …….
      I will refer my previous comment, “The way it was formed was very unorthodox so don’t expect it to be fully established so soon”.
       
      Do you think seeking new talented members will cause damage than benefit? …….
      If the new talented members have the right attitudes, the party can be more benefited.
       
      Do you think a party should only announce “our party is open to all and passively wait for applications? …….
      What do you want me to say? I still remember a story from “Shwe Thwe”, weekly cartoons for children, that I read when I was young. It was about a lazy princess who didn’t make a move until her servants called her name in a certain number of times. Her habit of waiting to be called nearly cost her life. She only changed the rule of calling her only after the servants failed to call her name in a life threatening event.
      My view is that people should be pro-active themselves. If they are waiting to be called their names, in my opinion, they are not talented enough. To join a political party can be a life-time commitment. I am not against the talented people, but people have to understand themselves what they want in their lives, not forcing by anyone. But having said that recruiting various consultancy roles (may be members or non-members), paid or unpaid, are quite a norm to a lot of governing/political organizations, I believe NLD might be seeking the advisers for their party.  
       
      Lastly about my word “outrageous”, I know I am not overly polite but I also know I am not rude. I am not swearing nor using some foul languages (like farther, mother – steps, etc.) to anyone. We are in a battle of opinions; everyone can express their opinions as long as they don’t break the rules of the house.

  15.  I don’t understand you for not accepting the fact that a party should
    recruit talented members. Do you believe NLD is so great and so  perfect
    that it doesn’t  need anyone? Do you think seeking new talented members
    will cause damage than benefit?Do you think a party should only
    announce ” our party is open to all and passively wait for
    applications.?

    You seem very smart and eloquent and a strong
    supporter of NLD.  But I don’t understand you take “recruitment” as an
    offend to NLD hard working members.I read all your comments.You make many good points. many
    of your comments are reasonable but I dont not agree with  you  on 
    Recruitment.

    One more, I can’t accept your  attacks on those
    having different views and suggestion( Naing Moe Aung and others). you can
    defend your views but I dont think your reply ” This is an outrageous
    suggestion Naing Moe Aung ” is not polite as an academic.

  16. ေကာင္ဆိုး ကေလး

    I think she won’t be a president because hopeless 2008 constitution which is very hard to fix. One thing that makes me unhappy is she did not see much who really supported her(exile activists and ethnics group) during 24 years. when she was in house arrested they had made very loud voice to international community to support her. I don’t know about her deal with government but my point of view she should be involve in peace process and unity with opposition groups. Government also needs to agree for that. She may not be but I think other NLD’s members have been removed scaffolding before pagoda has finished. I can see there are no unity among NLD. One thing they know is they are so proud of being NLD and being jail for their believes. Also you can’t criticize NLD or Daw Suu even they often said they are democratic party. In my point of view most of them are the same with ruling party’s members. Anyway I am still enjoying to see little change instead of nothing change.    

  17. A good commentary animadverting   quite harshly upon her leadership issues.  Some of the points are rightly said. But let’s not forget one thing that is she is possibly still in the thick  of political wheeling and dealing, and she is obviously left with no better option than joining them as she can’t beat them now, which has so far yielded some good results.  She already beat the socks off of some   of her foes in uniform now now  effectively made quite  powerless. She has circumvented some daunting hurdles many critics thought too daunting to overcome. Yes, her party needs some leaders who can do their job reliably.  After all, isn’t a god-send for us to have such a capable person who has become a powerful force to be reckoned with, giving those mean military men nightmares?  As a matter of fact, not only her party but the world country is in a mess  caused by successive regimes. We, Burmese, tend to leap to conclusions without waiting long enough.  Regarding her being on the same side with Thein Sein, what better option is there?  If you can’t beat them, join them, instead of treading water!  Things need time to develop, Ko Aung Zaw. Sometimes it pays to be non-committal, all the more so politically!  Long live Daw Su! God bless Burma! 

    Myo Han

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